Moche-Wagner College Bioarchaeology Field School in Huanchaco, Peru

 

June 25–July 25, 2017

 

 

Interested in spending a month in Peru studying skeletons?

• Learn how to estimate age, sex and health from human skeletal remains
• Visit world-famous archaeological sites and learn about the prehistory of Peru, focusing on the ancient Moche people
• Live on the beach in Huanchaco and learn about contemporary life in Peru
• Students without previous osteological training will learn the basics
• Students with previous osteological training will further develop their skills and have the option to complete a research project
• Spanish not required. Non-majors accepted.
• Non-credit and for-credit options available (credits earned from Wagner College)

PROGRAM This field school provides students with training and experience in osteological analysis as well as basic instruction on the prehistory of north coastal Peru. This season, we will working with both excavated and salvaged human remains from Pampa la Cruz, which was occupied from 200 B.C. to 800 A.D. There will also be opportunities to learn about excavation by working with the Moche field school. We will spend Saturdays touring local archaeological sites. Sundays are open.

LOCATION The field school is based in Huanchaco, a pleasant fishing village and beach resort just a few miles outside of Trujillo, the largest city on Peru’s north coast. Students live in a hostel one block from the beach and a few blocks from Pampa la Cruz. Group meals are provided 6 days a week.MOCHE

COSTS Non-credit option: $2,200, covers 3 meals daily, 6 days a
week, including local transportation and all site and museum entrance fees.
Optional additional $250 for overnight trip to Cajamarca
3-credit (1-unit) option: additional $2,850
6-credit (2-unit) option: additional $5,700
Fees do not include airfare to Trujillo, Sunday meals, laundry or personal expenses.

If you are interested, contact Professor Celeste Gagnon at celeste.gagnon@wagner.edu or (718) 390-3126. For more information, visit the Moche Bioarchaeology Field School website.